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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:罗森·普列夫 大小:xzGSldFL33928KB 下载:QeG3STes11171次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:0EFMVTp553038条
日期:2020-08-04 20:24:10
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韩胜强

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  This was what he said, but all the time he was expecting to beable to string the bow and shoot through the iron, whereas in facthe was to be the first that should taste of the arrows from thehands of Ulysses, whom he was dishonouring in his own house- eggingthe others on to do so also.
2.  "When however, we had sacked the city of Priam, and were settingsail in our ships as heaven had dispersed us, then Jove saw fit to vexthe Argives on their homeward voyage; for they had Not all been eitherwise or understanding, and hence many came to a bad end through thedispleasure of Jove's daughter Minerva, who brought about a quarrelbetween the two sons of Atreus.
3.  "If you are Ulysses," said he, "then what you have said is just.We have done much wrong on your lands and in your house. ButAntinous who was the head and front of the offending lies low already.It was all his doing. It was not that he wanted to marry Penelope;he did not so much care about that; what he wanted was something quitedifferent, and Jove has not vouchsafed it to him; he wanted to killyour son and to be chief man in Ithaca. Now, therefore, that he hasmet the death which was his due, spare the lives of your people. Wewill make everything good among ourselves, and pay you in full for allthat we have eaten and drunk. Each one of us shall pay you a fineworth twenty oxen, and we will keep on giving you gold and bronze tillyour heart is softened. Until we have done this no one can complain ofyour being enraged against us."
4.  Then Penelope answered, "Stranger, heaven robbed me of all beauty,whether of face or figure, when the Argives set sail for Troy and mydear husband with them. If he were to return and look after my affairsI should be both more respected and should show a better presence tothe world. As it is, I am oppressed with care, and with theafflictions which heaven has seen fit to heap upon me. The chiefs fromall our islands- Dulichium, Same, and Zacynthus, as also from Ithacaitself, are wooing me against my will and are wasting my estate. I cantherefore show no attention to strangers, nor suppliants, nor topeople who say that they are skilled artisans, but am all the timebrokenhearted about Ulysses. They want me to marry again at once,and I have to invent stratagems in order to deceive them. In the firstplace heaven put it in my mind to set up a great tambour-frame in myroom, and to begin working upon an enormous piece of fineneedlework. Then I said to them, 'Sweethearts, Ulysses is indeed dead,still, do not press me to marry again immediately; wait- for I wouldnot have my skill in needlework perish unrecorded- till I havefinished making a pall for the hero Laertes, to be ready against thetime when death shall take him. He is very rich, and the women ofthe place will talk if he is laid out without a pall.' This was what Isaid, and they assented; whereon I used to keep working at my greatweb all day long, but at night I would unpick the stitches again bytorch light. I fooled them in this way for three years without theirfinding it out, but as time wore on and I was now in my fourth year,in the waning of moons, and many days had been accomplished, thosegood-for-nothing hussies my maids betrayed me to the suitors, whobroke in upon me and caught me; they were very angry with me, so I wasforced to finish my work whether I would or no. And now I do not seehow I can find any further shift for getting out of this marriage.My parents are putting great pressure upon me, and my son chafes atthe ravages the suitors are making upon his estate, for he is nowold enough to understand all about it and is perfectly able to lookafter his own affairs, for heaven has blessed him with an excellentdisposition. Still, notwithstanding all this, tell me who you areand where you come from- for you must have had father and mother ofsome sort; you cannot be the son of an oak or of a rock."
5.  She then went upstairs to her own room, not alone, but attended byher maidens, and when there, she lamented her dear husband tillMinerva shed sweet sleep over her eyelids.
6.  "Firstly, then, I will tell you my name that you too may know it,and one day, if I outlive this time of sorrow, may become my thereguests though I live so far away from all of you. I am Ulysses sonof Laertes, reknowned among mankind for all manner of subtlety, sothat my fame ascends to heaven. I live in Ithaca, where there is ahigh mountain called Neritum, covered with forests; and not far fromit there is a group of islands very near to one another- Dulichium,Same, and the wooded island of Zacynthus. It lies squat on thehorizon, all highest up in the sea towards the sunset, while theothers lie away from it towards dawn. It is a rugged island, but itbreeds brave men, and my eyes know none that they better love tolook upon. The goddess Calypso kept me with her in her cave, andwanted me to marry her, as did also the cunning Aeaean goddessCirce; but they could neither of them persuade me, for there isnothing dearer to a man than his own country and his parents, andhowever splendid a home he may have in a foreign country, if it be farfrom father or mother, he does not care about it. Now, however, I willtell you of the many hazardous adventures which by Jove's will I metwith on my return from Troy.

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1.  "Stranger," said he, "how suddenly you have changed from what youwere a moment or two ago. You are dressed differently and yourcolour is not the same. Are you some one or other of the gods thatlive in heaven? If so, be propitious to me till I can make you duesacrifice and offerings of wrought gold. Have mercy upon me."
2.  "And what, Telemachus, has led you to take this long sea voyage toLacedaemon? Are you on public or private business? Tell me all aboutit."
3.  Thus did he speak, and his saying pleased them well, so Mulius ofDulichium, servant to Amphinomus, mixed them a bowl of wine andwater and handed it round to each of them man by man, whereon theymade their drink-offerings to the blessed gods: Then, when they hadmade their drink-offerings and had drunk each one as he was minded,they took their several ways each of them to his own abode.
4.  On this he began chopping firewood, while the others brought in afine fat five year old boar pig, and set it at the altar. Eumaeusdid not forget the gods, for he was a man of good principles, so thefirst thing he did was to cut bristles from the pig's face and throwthem into the fire, praying to all the gods as he did so thatUlysses might return home again. Then he clubbed the pig with a billetof oak which he had kept back when he was chopping the firewood, andstunned it, while the others slaughtered and singed it. Then theycut it up, and Eumaeus began by putting raw pieces from each jointon to some of the fat; these he sprinkled with barley meal, and laidupon the embers; they cut the rest of the meat up small, put thepieces upon the spits and roasted them till they were done; whenthey had taken them off the spits they threw them on to the dresser ina heap. The swineherd, who was a most equitable man, then stood upto give every one his share. He made seven portions; one of these heset apart for Mercury the son of Maia and the nymphs, praying tothem as he did so; the others he dealt out to the men man by man. Hegave Ulysses some slices cut lengthways down the loin as a mark ofespecial honour, and Ulysses was much pleased. "I hope, Eumaeus," saidhe, "that Jove will be as well disposed towards you as I am, for therespect you are showing to an outcast like myself."
5.  "For six days my men kept driving in the best cows and feasting uponthem, but when Jove the son of Saturn had added a seventh day, thefury of the gale abated; we therefore went on board, raised our masts,spread sail, and put out to sea. As soon as we were well away from theisland, and could see nothing but sky and sea, the son of Saturnraised a black cloud over our ship, and the sea grew dark beneathit. We not get on much further, for in another moment we were caughtby a terrific squall from the West that snapped the forestays of themast so that it fell aft, while all the ship's gear tumbled about atthe bottom of the vessel. The mast fell upon the head of thehelmsman in the ship's stern, so that the bones of his head werecrushed to pieces, and he fell overboard as though he were diving,with no more life left in him.
6.  "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, so you would start home to yourown land at once? Good luck go with you, but if you could only knowhow much suffering is in store for you before you get back to your owncountry, you would stay where you are, keep house along with me, andlet me make you immortal, no matter how anxious you may be to see thiswife of yours, of whom you are thinking all the time day after day;yet I flatter myself that at am no whit less tall or well-looking thanshe is, for it is not to be expected that a mortal woman shouldcompare in beauty with an immortal."

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1.  He had hardly done speaking when Amphinomus turned in his placeand saw the ship inside the harbour, with the crew lowering her sails,and putting by their oars; so he laughed, and said to the others,"We need not send them any message, for they are here. Some god musthave told them, or else they saw the ship go by, and could notovertake her.
2.  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "My son, I will tellyou the real truth. He says he is a Cretan, and that he has been agreat traveller. At this moment he is running away from aThesprotian ship, and has refuge at my station, so I will put him intoyour hands. Do whatever you like with him, only remember that he isyour suppliant."
3.  And Ulysses said, "Nausicaa, daughter of great Alcinous, may Jovethe mighty husband of Juno, grant that I may reach my home; so shall Ibless you as my guardian angel all my days, for it was you who savedme."
4.  "'What ails you, Polyphemus,' said they, 'that you make such anoise, breaking the stillness of the night, and preventing us frombeing able to sleep? Surely no man is carrying off your sheep?Surely no man is trying to kill you either by fraud or by force?
5.   She went wondering back into the house, and laid her son's saying inher heart. Then, going upstairs with her handmaids into her room,she mourned her dear husband till Minerva shed sweet sleep over hereyes. But the suitors were clamorous throughout the covered cloisters,and prayed each one that he might be her bed fellow.
6.  "Then I saw Chloris, whom Neleus married for her beauty, havinggiven priceless presents for her. She was youngest daughter to Amphionson of Iasus and king of Minyan Orchomenus, and was Queen in Pylos.She bore Nestor, Chromius, and Periclymenus, and she also bore thatmarvellously lovely woman Pero, who was wooed by all the countryround; but Neleus would only give her to him who should raid thecattle of Iphicles from the grazing grounds of Phylace, and this was ahard task. The only man who would undertake to raid them was a certainexcellent seer, but the will of heaven was against him, for therangers of the cattle caught him and put him in prison; neverthelesswhen a full year had passed and the same season came round again,Iphicles set him at liberty, after he had expounded all the oracles ofheaven. Thus, then, was the will of Jove accomplished.

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1.  While he was thus in two minds a wave caught him and took him withsuch force against the rocks that he would have been smashed andtorn to pieces if Minerva had not shown him what to do. He caught holdof the rock with both hands and clung to it groaning with pain tillthe wave retired, so he was saved that time; but presently the wavecame on again and carried him back with it far into the sea-tearinghis hands as the suckers of a polypus are torn when some one plucks itfrom its bed, and the stones come up along with it even so did therocks tear the skin from his strong hands, and then the wave drewhim deep down under the water.
2.  All this he told, but Ulysses was overcome as he heard him, andhis cheeks were wet with tears. He wept as a woman weeps when shethrows herself on the body of her husband who has fallen before hisown city and people, fighting bravely in defence of his home andchildren. She screams aloud and flings her arms about him as he liesgasping for breath and dying, but her enemies beat her from behindabout the back and shoulders, and carry her off into slavery, to alife of labour and sorrow, and the beauty fades from her cheeks-even so piteously did Ulysses weep, but none of those presentperceived his tears except Alcinous, who was sitting near him, andcould hear the sobs and sighs that he was heaving. The king,therefore, at once rose and said:
3.  The company then laid their hands upon the good things that werebefore them, but as soon as they had had enough to eat and drink,the muse inspired Demodocus to sing the feats of heroes, and moreespecially a matter that was then in the mouths of all men, to wit,the quarrel between Ulysses and Achilles, and the fierce words thatthey heaped on one another as they gat together at a banquet. ButAgamemnon was glad when he heard his chieftains quarrelling with oneanother, for Apollo had foretold him this at Pytho when he crossed thestone floor to consult the oracle. Here was the beginning of theevil that by the will of Jove fell both Danaans and Trojans.
4、TELL ME, O MUSE, of that ingenious hero who travelled far and wideafter he had sacked the famous town of Troy. Many cities did he visit,and many were the nations with whose manners and customs he wasacquainted; moreover he suffered much by sea while trying to savehis own life and bring his men safely home; but do what he might hecould not save his men, for they perished through their own sheerfolly in eating the cattle of the Sun-god Hyperion; so the godprevented them from ever reaching home. Tell me, too, about allthese things, O daughter of Jove, from whatsoever source you mayknow them.
5、  "King Apollo," answered Mercury, "I only wish I might get thechance, though there were three times as many chains- and you mightlook on, all of you, gods and goddesses, but would sleep with her if Icould."

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  • 林雪锋 08-03

      This was what Minerva was already eager to bring about, so downshe darted from off the topmost summits of Olympus.

  • 张周来 08-03

      "Son of Atreus," replied Telemachus, "do not press me to staylonger; I should be contented to remain with you for another twelvemonths; I find your conversation so delightful that I should neveronce wish myself at home with my parents; but my crew whom I have leftat Pylos are already impatient, and you are detaining me from them. Asfor any present you may be disposed to make me, I had rather that itshould he a piece of plate. I will take no horses back with me toIthaca, but will leave them to adorn your own stables, for you havemuch flat ground in your kingdom where lotus thrives, as alsomeadowsweet and wheat and barley, and oats with their white andspreading ears; whereas in Ithaca we have neither open fields norracecourses, and the country is more fit for goats than horses, andI like it the better for that. None of our islands have much levelground, suitable for horses, and Ithaca least of all."

  • 金民律 08-03

       "I know, Eurynome," replied Penelope, "that you mean well, but donot try and persuade me to wash and to anoint myself, for heavenrobbed me of all my beauty on the day my husband sailed; nevertheless,tell Autonoe and Hippodamia that I want them. They must be with mewhen I am in the cloister; I am not going among the men alone; itwould not be proper for me to do so."

  • 吴聪娣 08-03

      "Telemachus," said she, "the men are on board and at their oars,waiting for you to give your orders, so make haste and let us be off."

  • 汪后富 08-02

    {  Then Ulysses said: "Pray, Alcinous, do not take any such notion intoyour head. I have nothing of the immortal about me, neither in bodynor mind, and most resemble those among you who are the mostafflicted. Indeed, were I to tell you all that heaven has seen fitto lay upon me, you would say that I was still worse off than theyare. Nevertheless, let me sup in spite of sorrow, for an empty stomachis a very importunate thing, and thrusts itself on a man's notice nomatter how dire is his distress. I am in great trouble, yet it insiststhat I shall eat and drink, bids me lay aside all memory of my sorrowsand dwell only on the due replenishing of itself. As for yourselves,do as you propose, and at break of day set about helping me to gethome. I shall be content to die if I may first once more behold myproperty, my bondsmen, and all the greatness of my house."

  • 文苏玲 08-01

      "Run and fetch them," answered Ulysses, "while my arrows hold out,or when I am alone they may get me away from the door."}

  • 吴珏 08-01

      "Nine days and nine nights did we sail, and on the tenth day ournative land showed on the horizon. We got so close in that we couldsee the stubble fires burning, and I, being then dead beat, fellinto a light sleep, for I had never let the rudder out of my ownhands, that we might get home the faster. On this the men fell totalking among themselves, and said I was bringing back gold and silverin the sack that Aeolus had given me. 'Bless my heart,' would one turnto his neighbour, saying, 'how this man gets honoured and makesfriends to whatever city or country he may go. See what fine prizes heis taking home from Troy, while we, who have travelled just as faras he has, come back with hands as empty as we set out with- and nowAeolus has given him ever so much more. Quick- let us see what itall is, and how much gold and silver there is in the sack he gavehim.'

  • 郭莹莹 08-01

      Many a plausible tale did Ulysses further tell her, and Penelopewept as she listened, for her heart was melted. As the snow wastesupon the mountain tops when the winds from South East and West havebreathed upon it and thawed it till the rivers run bank full withwater, even so did her cheeks overflow with tears for the husbandwho was all the time sitting by her side. Ulysses felt for her and wasfor her, but he kept his eyes as hard as or iron without lettingthem so much as quiver, so cunningly did he restrain his tears.Then, when she had relieved herself by weeping, she turned to himagain and said: "Now, stranger, I shall put you to the test and seewhether or no you really did entertain my husband and his men, asyou say you did. Tell me, then, how he was dressed, what kind of a manhe was to look at, and so also with his companions."

  • 何海龙 07-31

       "[The gale from the West had now spent its force, and the wind gotinto the South again, which frightened me lest I should be takenback to the terrible whirlpool of Charybdis. This indeed was whatactually happened, for I was borne along by the waves all night, andby sunrise had reacfied the rock of Scylla, and the whirlpool. She wasthen sucking down the salt sea water, but I was carried aloft towardthe fig tree, which I caught hold of and clung on to like a bat. Icould not plant my feet anywhere so as to stand securely, for theroots were a long way off and the boughs that overshadowed the wholepool were too high, too vast, and too far apart for me to reachthem; so I hung patiently on, waiting till the pool should dischargemy mast and raft again- and a very long while it seemed. A jurymanis not more glad to get home to supper, after having been longdetained in court by troublesome cases, than I was to see my raftbeginning to work its way out of the whirlpool again. At last I let gowith my hands and feet, and fell heavily into the sea, bard by my rafton to which I then got, and began to row with my hands. As for Scylla,the father of gods and men would not let her get further sight ofme- otherwise I should have certainly been lost.]

  • 王成康 07-29

    {  "Immediately after we had got past the island I saw a great wavefrom which spray was rising, and I heard a loud roaring sound. The menwere so frightened that they loosed hold of their oars, for thewhole sea resounded with the rushing of the waters, but the shipstayed where it was, for the men had left off rowing. I went round,therefore, and exhorted them man by man not to lose heart.

  • 谭地宋 07-29

      Thus did he speak. Every one approved his saying, and agreed that heshould have his escort inasmuch as he had spoken reasonably. Then whenthey had made their drink-offerings, and had drunk each as much ashe was minded they went home to bed every man in his own abode,leaving Ulysses in the cloister with Arete and Alcinous while theservants were taking the things away after supper. Arete was the firstto speak, for she recognized the shirt, cloak, and good clothes thatUlysses was wearing, as the work of herself and of her maids; so shesaid, "Stranger, before we go any further, there is a question Ishould like to ask you. Who, and whence are you, and who gave youthose clothes? Did you not say you had come here from beyond the sea?"

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