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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:吕修全 大小:him5lid382188KB 下载:CYEe5uuD51031次
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日期:2020-08-05 21:54:01
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Now beganne Reniero to laughe very heartily, and perceiving howswiftly the day ran on in his course, he saide unto her. Beleeve meMadame Helena, you have so conjured me by mine endeered Ladie andMistresse, that I am no longer able to deny you; wherefore, tell mewhere your garments are, and I will bring them to you, that you maycome downe from the Turret. She beleeving his promise, tolde him whereshe had hid them, and Reniero departing from the Tower, commandedhis servant, not to stirre thence: but to abide still so neere it,as none might get entrance there till his returning. Which chargewas no sooner given to his man, but hee went to the house of a neereneighboring friend, where he dined well, and afterward laid himdowne to sleepe.
2.  Maide, go home againe, and tell Calandrino, that he must keephimselfe very warme: and I my selfe will instantly be with him, toenstruct him further in the quality of his sicknesse.
3.  The Woman having her eyes fixed on the ground, knew not well howshee should denie him; and yet in plaine words, to say shee consented,shee held it to be overbase and immodest, and ill agreeing with herformer reputation: when the Abbot had well noted this attention inher, and how silent shee stood without returning any answere; heaccounted the conquest to be more then halfe his owne: so thatcontinuing on his former perswasions, hee never ceased, but alluredher still to beleeve whatsoever he saide. And much ashamed of hisimportunity, but more of her owne flexible yeelding weaknesse, madeanswere, that shee would willingly accomplish his request; which yetshee did not absolutely grant, untill Ferando were first sent intoPurgatory. And till then (quoth the Abbot) I will not urge any more,because I purpose his speedy sending thither: but yet, so farre lendme your assistance, that either to morrow, or else the next day, hemay come hither once more to converse with me. So putting a faire goldRing on her finger, they parted till the next meeting.
4.  Sometime there lived in Sienna two popular men; the one beingnamed Tingoccio Mini, and the other Meucio de Tura; Men simple, and ofno understanding, both of them dwelling in Porta Salaia. These two menlived in such familiar conversation together, and expressed suchcordiall affection each to other, as they seldome walked asunder;but (as honest men use to doe) frequented Churches and Sermons,oftentimes hearing, both what miseries and beatitudes were in theworld to come, according to the merits of their soules that weredeparted out of this life, and found their equall repaiment in theother. The manifold repetition of these matters, made them veryearnestly desirous to know, by what meanes they might have tydingsfrom thence, for their further confirmation. And finding all theirendeavours utterly frustrated, they made a solemne vow and promise(each to other under oath) that hee which first dyed of them two,should returne backe againe (so soone as possibly he could) to theother remaining alive, and tell him such tydings as hee desired toheare.
5.  When of them had delivered their Novels, Dioneus knowing, that itremained in him to relate the last for this day: without attending forany solemne command (after he had imposed silence on them, thatcould not sufficiently commend the witty reprehension of Guido),thus he began. Wise and worthy Ladies, although by the priviledgeyou have granted, it is lawfull for me to speake any thing bestpleasing to my self: yet notwithstanding, it is not any part of mymeaning, to varrie from the matter and method, whereof you have spokento very good purpose. And therefore, following your footsteppes, Ientend to tell you, how craftily, and with a Rampiar sodainly raisedin his owne defence: a Religious Frier of Saint Anthonies Order,shunned a shame, which two O wily companions had prepared for him. Norlet it offend you, if I run into more large discourse, then this dayhath bene used by any, for the apter compleating of my Novell:because, if you well observe it, the Sun is as yet in the middest ofheaven, and therefore you may the better forbeare me.
6.  THE SONG

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1.  Now, over and beside all these admirable qualities, hee hath maniemore such singularities, which (in favour towards him) I am faine toconceale. But that which I smile most at in him, is, that he wouldhave a Wife in every place where he commeth, yea, and a good houseto boot too: for, in regard his beard beginneth to shew it selfe,rising thicke in haire, blacke and amiable, he is verily perswaded,that all Women will fall in love with him; and if they refuse tofollow him, he will in all hast run after them. But truly, he is anotable servant to mee, for I cannot speake with any one, and in neverso great secrecy, but he will be sure to heare his part; and whenany question is demanded of me, he standes in such awe and feare of mydispleasure: that he will bee sure to make the first answer, yea orno, according as he thinketh it most convenient.
2.  Gisippus, thy bounty and firme friendship suffereth me to seeapparantly, what (on my part) is no more then ought to be done. Allthe Gods forbid, that I should receive as mine, her whom they haveadjudged to be thine, by true respect of birth and desert. For if theyhad thought her a wife fit for me, doe not thou or any else imagine,that ever she should have beene granted to thee. Use freelytherefore thine owne election, and the gracious favour wherewiththey have blessed thee: leave me to consume away in teares, a mourninggarment by them appointed for me, as being a man unworthy of suchhappinesse; for either I shall conquer this disaster, and that wilbe my crowne, or else will vanquish me, and free me from all paine:whereto Gisippus presently thus answered.
3.  Blest were those happy dayes:
4.  Madame, saide the Pilgrime, the unfortinate young Gentleman thatis slaine, did never love you; but sure I am, that Theobaldo Eliseiloved you deerely. But tell me, what was the occasion whereby youconceived such hatred against him? Did he at any time offend you? Notruly Sir, quoth shee; but the reason of my anger towards him, wasby the words and threatnings of a religious Father, to whom once Irevealed (under confession) how faithfully I affected him, and whatprivate familiarity had passed betweene us. When iristantly he usedsuch dreadfull threatnings to me, and which (even yet) doe afflictmy soule, that I did not abstaine, and utterly refuse him, theDivell would fetch me quicke to Hell, and cast me into the bottomeof his quenchlesse and everlasting fire.
5.  The Abbot riding on, with newer crotchets in his braine then hehad before the sight of Alessandro, it fortuned, that after diversdayes of travaile, they came to a small Country Village, whichaffoorded little store of Lodging, and yet the Abbot would needeslye there. Alessandro, being well acquainted with the Hoste of thehouse, willed him to provide for the Abbot and his people, and then tolodge him where hee thought it meetest. Now before the Abbotscomming thither, the Harbenger that marshalled all such matters, hadprovided for his Traine in the Village, some in one place, andothers elsewhere, in the best maner that the Towne could yeelde. Butwhen the Abbot had supt, a great part of the night being spent, andevery one else at his rest; Alessandro demaunded of the Hoste, whatprovision he had made for him, and how hee should be lodged thatnight?
6.  You are to understand then, that there lived in Siena, a proper yongman, of good birth and well friended, being named Reynard. Earnestlyhe affected his neere dwelling neighbour, a beautifull Gentlewoman,and wife to a man of good esteeme: of whom hee grew halfe perswaded,that if he could (without suspition) compasse private conferencewith her, he should reach the height of his amorous desires. Yetseeing no likely meanes wherewith to further his hope, and sheebeing great with childe, he resolved to become a Godfather to thechilde, at such time as it should be brought to Christening. And beinginwardly acquainted with her Husband, who was named Credulano; suchfamiliar intercourses passed betweene them, both of Reynards kindeoffer, and Credulanoes as courteous acceptance, that hee was set downefor a Gossippe.

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1.  The Abbesse verily credited his answer, demanding what he meant insaying, that he did service to nine? Madam, quoth he, this were adangerous question, and not easily answered before fore the eightSisters. Upon this reply, the Abbesse plainely perceived, that notonely she had fallen into foll but all the Nunnes likewise criedguilty too: wherfore being a woman of sound discretion, she wouldnot grant that Massetto should depart, but to keepe him still aboutthe Nunnes businesse, because the Monastery should not bescandalized by him. And the Fac-totum being dead a little before,his strange recovery of speech revealed, and some things else moreneerely concerning them: by generall consent, and with the good likingof Massetto, he was created the Fac-totum of the Monasterie.
2.  Worthy Gentlemen, this Lady is that true and faithfull servant,wherof I moved the question to you, whom I tooke out of the coldstreet, where her parents, kindred and friends (making no account atall of her) threw her forth, as a thing vile and unprofitable.Neverthelesse, such hath been my care and cost, that I have rescuedher out of deaths griping power; and, in a meere charitabledisposition, which honest affection caused me to beare her; of a body,full of terror and affrighting (as then she was) I have caused herto become thus lovely as you see. But because you may moreapparantly discerne, in what manner this occasion happened; I will layit open to you in more familiar manner. Then he began the wholehistory, from the originall of his unbeseeming affection to her (inregard she was a worthy mans wife) and consequently, how all hadhappened to the instant houre, to the no meane admiration of all thehearers, adding withall. Now Gentlemen (quoth he) if you varry notfrom your former opinion, and especially Signior NicoluccioCaccianimico: this Lady (by good right) is mine, and no man els by anyjust title, can lay any claime to her.
3.  And to be warned by my wretched fate;
4.  He wrought such meanes, that he came acquainted with a poorewoman, who often frequented Bernardoes house, and was greatly infavour with his wife; upon whose poverty he so prevailed, by earnestperswasions, but much more by large gifts of money, that he won her tofurther him in this manner following. A faire and artificiall Chest hecaused to be purposely made, wherein himselfe might be aptlycontained, and so conveyed into the House of Bernardoes Wife, undercolour of a formall excuse; that the poore woman should be absent fromthe City two or three dayes, and shee must keepe it safe till shereturne. The Gentlewoman suspecting no guile, but that the Chest wasthe receptacle of all the womans wealth; would trust it in no otherroome, then her owne Bed-chamber, which was the place whereAmbroginolo most desired to bee.
5.   It is no long time since, that there lived in Genes or Geneway, aGentleman named Signior Herminio de Grimaldo, who (as every one welknew) was more rich in inheritances, and ready summes of currant moneythen any other knowne Citizen in Italy. And as hee surpassed other menin wealth, so did he likewise excell them in wretched Avarice, beingso miserably greedy and covetous, as no man in the world could be morewicked that way; because, not onely he kept his purse lockt up frompleasuring any, but denied needfull things to himselfe, enduringmany miseries onely to avoid expences, contrary to the Genewayesgenerall custom, who alwayes delighted to be decently cloathed, and tohave their dyet of the best. By reason of which most miserablebasenesse, they tooke away from him the Sirname of Grimaldi, whereofhe was in right descended, and called him master Herminio the covetousMizer, a nickname very notably agreeing with his gripple nature.
6.  But when hee came to pay his hoste, hee found not any penny lefthim: whereupon (as well he might) he grew greatly offended, and raisedmuch trouble in the house, charged the hoasts people to have robdehim, and threatening to have them sent as prisoners to Sienna.Suddenly entred Fortarigo in his shirt, with intent to have stolneAniollieroes garments, as formerly hee did the money out of his purse,and seeing him ready to mount on horsebacke, hee saide.

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1.  Let me advise
2.  Is it even so Wife? answered Messer Lizio. Must your will and minebe governed by our Daughter? Well be it so then, let her bed be madein the Garden Gallerie, but I will have the keeping of the key, bothto locke her in at night, and set her at liberty every morning. Woman,woman, yong wenches are wily, many wanton crotchets are busie in theirbraines, and to us that are aged, they sing like Lapwings, tellingus one thing, and intending another; talking of Nightingales, whentheir mindes run on Cocke-Sparrowes. Seeing Wife, she must needes haveher minde, let yet your care and mine extend so farre, to keepe herchastity uncorrupted, and our credulity from being abused. Catharinahaving thus prevailed with her Mother, her bed made in the GardenGallerie, and secret intelligence given to Ricciardo, for preparinghis meanes of accesse to her window; old provident Lizio lockes thedoore to bed-ward, and gives her liberty to come forth in the morning,for his owne lodging was neere to the same Gallery.
3.  Let me then tell ye, that Pope Boniface (with whom the fore-namedMesser Geri Spina was in great regard) having sent divers Gentlemen ofhis Court to Florence as Ambassadors, about very serious and importantbusinesse: they were lodged in the house of Messer Geri Spina, andhe employed (with them) in the saide Popes negotiation. It chanced,that as being the most convenient way for passage, every morningthey walked on foot by the Church of Saint Marie d'Ughi, whereCistio the Baker dwelt, and exercised the trade belonging to him.Now although Fortune had humbled him to so meane a condition, yet sheeadded a blessing of wealth to that contemptible quality, and (assmiling on him continually) no disasters at any time befell him, butstill he flourished in riches, lived like a jolly Citizen, with allthings fitting for honest entertainment about him, and plenty of thebest Wines (both White and Claret) as Florence, or any part thereaboutyeelded.
4、  THE SONG
5、  But why do I trouble you with the repetition of so many countries? Icoasted on still, after I had past Saint Georges Arme, into Truffia,and then into Buffia which are Countries much inhabited, and withgreat people. From thence I went into the Land of Lying, where I foundstore of the Brethren of our Religion, and many other beside, whoshunned all paine and labour, onely for the love of God, and caredas little, for the paines and travailes which others tooke, exceptsome benefit arised thereby to them; nor spend they any money inthis Country, but such as is without stampe. Thence I went into theLand of Abruzzi, where the men and women goe in Galoches over theMountaines, and make them garments of their Swines guts. Not farrefrom thence, I found people, that carried bread in their staves, andwine in Satchels, when parting from them, I arrived among theMountaines of Bacchus, where all the waters run downe with a deepefall, and in short time, I went on so far, that I found my selfe to bein India Pastinaca; where I swear to you by the holy habit which Iweare on my body, that I saw Serpents Bye, things incredible, and suchas were never seene before.But because I would be loth to lye, so soone as I departed thence,I met with Maso de Saggio, who was a great Merchant there, and whomI found cracking Nuts, and selling Cockles by retale. Neverthelesse,al this while I could not finde what I sought for, and therefore I wasto passe from hence by water, if I intended to travaile thither, andso into the Holy Land, where coole fresh bread is sold for fourepence, and the hot is given away for nothing. There I found thevenerable Father (blame me not I beseech you) the most woorthiePatriarch of Jerusalem, who for the reverence due to the habite Iweare, and love to our Lord Baron Saint Anthony, would have me tosee al the holy Reliques, which he had there under his charge:wherof there were so many, as if I should recount them all to you, Inever could come to a conclusion. But yet not to leave youdiscomforted, I will relate some few of them to you. First of all,he shewed me the finger of the holy Ghost, so whole and perfect, asever it was. Next, the nose of the Cherubin, which appeared to SaintFrances; with the payring of the naile of a Seraphin; and one of theribbes of Verbum caro, fastened to one of the Windowes' covered withthe holy garments of the Catholique Faith. Then he tooke me into adarke Chappel, where he shewed me divers beames of the Starre thatappeared to the three Kings in the East. Also a Violl of SaintMichaels sweate, when he combatted with the divell: And the jaw-boneof dead Lazarus, with many other precious things beside. And because Iwas liberall to him, giving him two of the Plaines of Monte Morello,in the Vulgare Edition, and some of the Chapters del Caprezio, whichhe had long laboured in search of; he bestowed on me some of hisReliques. First, he gave me one of the eye-teeth of Santa Crux; anda litle Violl, filled with some part of the sound of those Belles,which hung in the sumptuous Temple of Salomon. Next, he gave mee theFeather of the Phoenix, which was with Noah in the Arke, as before Itold you. And one of the Woodden Pattens, which the good Saint Gerrardde Magnavilla used to weare in his travailes, and which I gave (notlong since) to Gerrardo di Bousy at Florence, where it is respectedwith much devotion. Moreover, he gave me a few of those Coales,wherwith the Phoenix of Noah was roasted; all which things I broughtaway thence with me. Now, most true it is, that my Superiour wouldnever suffer mee to shew them any where, untill he was faithfullycertified, whether they were the same precious Reliques, or no. Butperceyving by sundrie Myracles which they have wrought, and Letters ofsufficient credence receyved from the reverend Patriarch, that allis true, he hath graunted me permission to them, and because I woldnot trust any one with matters of such moment, I my selfe brought themhither with me. Now I must tell you, that the Feather of the samePhoenix, I conveyed into a small Cabinet or Casket, because itshould not be bent or broken. And the Coales wherewith the saidPhoenix was roasted, I put into another Casket, in all respects solike to the former, that many times I have taken one for another. Asnow at this instant it hath bin my fortune: for, imagining that Ibrought the Casket with the feather, I mistooke my self, and broughtthe other with the coales. Wherein doubtles I have not offended,because I am certaine, that we of our Order do not any thing, but itis ordred by divine direction, and our blessed Patron the LordeBaron Saint Anthony. And so much the rather, because about a senighthence, the Feast of Saint Anthony is to bee solemnized, against thepreparation whereof, and to kindle your zeale with the greaterfervencie: he put the Casket with the Coales into my hand, meaning,let you see the Feather, at some more fitting season. And therefore myblessed Sonnes and Daughters, put off your Bonnets, and come hitherwith devotion to looke upon them. But first let me tell you, whosoeveris marked by any of these Coales, with the signe of the Crosse: heor she shal live all this yeare happily, and no fire whatsoevershall come neere to touch or hurt them. So, singing a solemneAntheme in the praise of S. Anthony, he unveyled the Casket, andshewed the Coales openly.The simple multitude, having (with great admiration and reverence)a long while beheld them, they thronged in crouds to Fryar Onyon,giving him farre greater offerings, then before they had, andentreating him to marke them each after other. Whereupon, he takingthe coales in his hand, began to marke their garments of white, andthe veyles on the Womens heads, with Crosses of no meane extendure:affirming to them, that the more the Coales wasted with making thosegreat crosses, the more they still encreased in the Casket, as oftenbefore hee had made triall.

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  • 吴洪发 08-04

      THEIR POWER EQUALLY ALIKE, AS WELL UPON POORE AND MEANE

  • 武有志 08-04

      You may well imagine, that Chynons dismayed soule was not a littlecheared at these speeches; and therefore, without craving any longrespit of time for answer, thus he replyed. Lord Lysimachus, in such abusines as this is, you cannot have a faster friend then my selfe,at least, if such good hap may betide me, as you have more thenhalfe promised: and therefore do no more but command what you wouldhave to be effected by mee, and make no doubt of my courage in theexecution: whereon Lysimachus made this answer. Know then Chynon(quoth he) that three dayes hence, these marriages are to beecelebrated in the houses of Pasimondo and Hormisda: upon which day,thou, thy friends, and my selfe (with some others, in whom I reposeespeciall trust) by the friendly favour of night, will enter intotheir houses, while they are in the middest of their joviall feasting;and (seizing on the two Brides) beare them thence to a Shippe, which Iwill have lye in secret, waiting for our comming, and kill all such asshall presume to impeach us. This direction gave great contentmentto Chynon, who remained still in prison, without revealing a word tohis owne friends, untill the limited time was come.

  • 格伦·莱斯 08-04

       FORTUNE DOTH SOMETIME HUMBLE MEN, TO RAISE THEM

  • 傅绍林 08-04

      John and she being gone to bed together, and the Maide likewise,it was not long after, before Frederigo came, and knocking once softlyat the doore, which was very neere to their lodging Chamber, Johnheard the noise, and so did his wife. But to the end, that Johnmight not have the least scruple of suspition, she seemed to be fastasleepe; and Frederigo pausing a while, according to the orderdirected, knockt againe the second time. John wondering thereat verymuch, jogd his wife a litle, and saide to her: Tessa, hearest thounothing? Methinkes one knocketh at our doore. Monna Tessa, who wasbetter acquainted with the knocke, then plaine honest meaning Johnwas, dissembling as if shee awaked out of a drowsie dreame, saide:Alas Husband, dost thou know what this is? In the name of ourblessed Ladie, be not affraid, this is but the Spirit which haunts ourCountrey houses, whereof I have often told thee, and it hath manytimes much dismayed me, living heere alone without thy comfort. Nay,such hath bin my feare, that in divers nights past, so soone as Iheard the knockes: I was feigne to hide my selfe in the beddeover-head and eares (as we usually say) never daring to be so bold, asto looke out, untill it was broad open day. Arise good wife (quothJohn) and if it be such a Spirit of the Countrey, as thou talkestof, never be affraid; for before we went to bed, I said the Telucis,the Intemerata, with many other good prayers beside. Moreover, Imade the signe of the Crosse at every corner of our bed, in the nameof the Father, Son, and holy Ghost, so that no doubt at all needs tobe made, of any power it can have to hurt or touch us.

  • 欧力威 08-03

    {  When all the people were assembled in the Church together, FriarOnyon (never distrusting any injurie offered him, or that his closecommodities had bin medled withal) began his predication, uttering athousand lies to fit his purpose. And when he came to shew the featherof the Phoenix (having first in great devotion finisht the confession)he caused two goodly torches to be lighted, and ducking downe his headthree severall times, before hee would so much as touch the Taffata,he opened it with much reverence. So soone as the Cabinet came to beseen, off went his Hood, lowly he bowed downe his body, and utteringespecial praises of the Phoenix, and sacred properties of thewonderfull Relique, the Cover of the Cabinet being lifted uppe, he sawthe same to bee full of Coales. He could not suspect his Villaineboy to do this deede, for he knew him not to be endued with so muchwit, onely hee curst him for keeping it no better, and cursthimselfe also, for reposing trust in such a careles knave, knowing himto be slothfull, disobedient, negligent, and void of all honestunderstanding or grace. Sodainly (without blushing) lest his losseshould be discerned, he lifted his lookes and hands to heaven,speaking out so loude, as every one might easily heare him, thus: Othou omnipotent providence, for ever let thy power be praised. Thenmaking fast the Cabinet againe, and turning himselfe to the people,with lookes expressing admiration, he proceeded in this manner.

  • 王煜全 08-02

      Not long since, there lived in the City of Trevers, an Almaine orGermaine, named Arriguo, who being a poore man, served as a Porter, orburden-bearer for money, when any man pleased to employ him. Andyet, notwithstanding his poore and meane condition, he was generallyreputed, to be of good and sanctified life. In which regard (whetherit were true or no, I know not) it happened, that when he died (atleast as the men of Trevers themselves affirmed) in the very instanthoure of his departing, all the Belles in the great Church of Trevers,(not being pulled by the helpe of any hand) beganne to ring: whichbeing accounted for a miracle, every one saide; that this Arriguohad bene, and was a Saint. And presently all the people of the Cityran to the house where the dead body lay, and carried it (as asanctified body) into the great Church, where people, halt, lame,and blind, or troubled with any other diseases, were brought about it,even as if every one should forth-with be holpen, onely by theirtouching the body.}

  • 陶娜 08-02

      Some part of the Jewells he gave to him, who had beene at costwith marriage feasting, and some to his the Abbot, beside a bountiebestowed on Monkes. Then he sent a messenger to Saladine, with Lettersof his whole successe, and confessing himselfe (for ever) hisobliged servant: living many yeeres (after) with his wife Adalietta,and using greater curtesies to strangers, then ever before he haddone.

  • 王春强 08-02

      But above all the rest, Nicoluccio Caccianimico could never besatisfied with beholding her; and, enflamed with earnest desire, toknow what she was, could not refraine (seeing the Knight was goneout of the roome) but demaunded of her, whether she were of Bologna,or a stranger? when the Lady heard her selfe to be thus questioned,and by her Husband, it seemed painefull to her, to containe fromanswering: Neverthelesse, to perfect the Knights intended purpose, shesate silent. Others demaunded of her, whether the sweet Boy were hers,or no; and some questioned, if she were Gentiles Wife, or no, orelse his Kinsewoman; to all which demaunds, she returned not anyanswere. But when the Knight came to them againe, some of them said tohim. Sir, this woman is a goodly creature, but she appeareth to bedumbe, which were great pitty, if it should be so. Gentlemen (quothhe) it is no small argument of her vertue, to sit still and silentat this instant. Tell us then (said they) of whence, and what sheis. Therein (quoth he) I will quickely resolve you, upon yourconditionall promise: that none of you do remove from his place,whatsoever shall be said or done, untill I have fully delivered myminde. Every one bound himselfe by solemne promise, to perform what hehad appointed, and the Tables being voided, as also the Carpetslaid; then the Knight (sitting downe by the Lady) thus began.

  • 沈新文 08-01

       Thou hast (for him) my firm affection tryed.

  • 姬烨公 07-30

    {  For truth lives not in men,

  • 丁叮 07-30

      Mistresse shallow-braine, being swolne big with this wind, like anempty bladder; conceived no small pride in hearing these words,constantly crediting them to be true, and therefore thus answered. DidI not tel you Father Albert, that my beauty was celestiall? But Isweare by my beauty, notwithstanding your idle passed arrogancy, Iam heartily sorry for your so severe correction; which that it mayno more be inflicted on you, I do freely pardon you; yet with thisproviso, that you tell me what the God else saide unto you; wheretoFryar Albert thus replyed. Madam, seeing you have so graciouslyvouchsafed to pardon me, I will thankfully tell you all: but youmust be very carefull and respective, that whatsoever I shallreveale unto you, must so closely be concealed, as no livingcreature in the World may know it; for you are the onely happy Ladynow living, and that happinesse relleth on your silence andsecrecie: with solemne vowes and protestations she sealed up hermany promises, and then the Fryar thus proceeded.

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