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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:奕劻 大小:KTRMxZGk52052KB 下载:0p53Sz5Z76622次
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日期:2020-08-05 10:22:12
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李东颖

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  There dwelt sometime in Florence, and in the street of SaintBrancazio, a woollen Weaver, named John of Lorrayne; a man morehappy in his Art, then wise in any thing else beside: because,savouring somewhat of the Gregorie, and (in very deede)
2.  In the Citie of Pirato, there was an Edict or Statute, no lesseblameworthy (to speake uprightly) then most severe and cruell, which(without making any distinction) gave strict command; That everieWoman should be burned with fire, who husband found her in the acte ofAdultery, with any secret or familiar friend, as one deserving tobee thus abandoned, like such as prostituted their bodies to publikesale or hire. During the continuance of this sharpe Edict, it fortunedthat a Gentlewoman, who was named Phillippa, was found in herChamber one night, in the armes of a yong Gentleman of the sameCity, named Lazarino de Guazzagliotri, and by her owne husband,called Rinaldo de Pugliese, shee loving the young Gallant, as her ownelife, because hee was most compleate in all perfections, and every wayas deerely addicted to her.
3.  You may well imagine, this advise was not a little pleasing toTitus, wherupon Gisippus received home Sophronia into his house,with publike intention to make her his wife, according as was thecustome then observed, and Titus being perfectly recovered, waspresent at the Feast very ceremonially observed. When night wascome, the Ladies and Gentlewomen conducted Sophronia to theBride-Chamber, where they left her in her Husbands bed, and thendeparted all away. The Chamber wherein Titus used to lodge, joynedclose to that of Gisippus, for their easier accesse each to the other,at all times whensoever they pleased, and Gisippus being alone inthe Bride-Chamber, preparing as if he were comming to bed:extinguishing the light, he went softly to Titus, willing him to goeto bed to his wife. Which Titus hearing, overcome with shame andfeare, became repentant, and denyed to goe. But Gisippus, being a trueintyre friend indeed, and confirming his words with actions: after alittle lingring dispute, sent him to the Bride, and so soone as he wasin the bed with her, taking Sophronia gently by the hand, softly hemoved the usuall question to her, namely, if she were willing to behis wife.
4.  With patience Madam I endured all before, but now (me thinkes) heproceedeth too farre, which is not any way to be suffered; andtherefore I intended to let you know it, that you may perceive, howwel you are rewarded for the faithfull and loyall love you bearehim, and for which, I was even at deaths dore. Now, because you may bethe surer of my speeches, not to be any lyes or fables, and that youmay (if you please) approve the truth by your owne experience, Icaused my wife to send him word, that she would meet him to morrowat the Bathing-house appointed, about the houre of noone-day, whenpeople repose themselves in regard of the heates violence; withwhich answer the woman returned very jocondly. Let me now tell youLady, I hope you have better opinion of my wit, then any meaning inme, to send my wife thither; I rather did it to this end, thathaving acquainted you with his treacherous intent, you should supplymy wives place, by saving both his reputation and your owne, andfrustrating his unkind purpose to me. Moreover, upon the view of hisowne delusion, wrought by my wife in meere love to you, he shall seehis foule shame, and your most noble care, to keepe the rites ofmarriage betweene you still unstained.
5.  THE FIRST DAY, THE SECOND NOVELL
6.  Gisippus remaining still at Athens, in small regard of eyther theirsor his owne friends: not long after by meanes of sundry troublesomeCitizens; and partialities happening among the common people, wasbanished from Athens, and hee, as also all his familie, condemned toperpetuall exile: during which tempestuous time, Gisippus was becomenot onely wretchedly poore, but wandred abroad as a common begger;in which miserable condition he travelled to Rome, to try if Tituswould take any acknowledgement of him. Understanding that he wasliving, and one most respected among the Romanes, as being a greatCommander and a Senator: he enquired for the place where hee dwelt,and going to be neere about his house, stayed there so long, tillTitus came home, yet not daring to manifest himselfe, or speake a wordto him, in regard of his poore and miserable estate, but strove tohave him see him, to the end, that hee might acknowledge and callhim by his name; notwithstanding, Titus passed by him without eitherspeech, or looking on him: Which when Gisippus perceived, and makingfull account, that (at the least) he would remember him, in regardof former courtesies, done to him: confounded with griefe anddesperate thoughtes, hee departed thence, never meaning to see him anymore.

计划指导

1.  About some three or foure nights after, Meucio being fast asleepe inhis bed, the ghoste of Tingoccio appeared to him, and called soloude that Meucio awaking, demanded who called him? I am thy friendTingoccio, replied the ghoste, who according to my former promisemade, am come again in vision to thee, to tell thee tidings out of thenether world. Meucio was a while somewhat amazed: but, recollectinghis more manly spirits together, boldly he said. My brother andfriend, thou art heartily welcome: but I thought thou hadst beeneutterly lost. Those things (quoth Tingoccio) are lost, which cannot berecovered againe, and if I were lost, how could I then be heere withthee? Alas Tingoccio, replyed Meucio, my meaning is not so: but Iwould be resolved, whether thou art among the damned soules, in thepainefull fire of hell torments, or no? No (quoth Tingoccio) I amnot sent thither, but for divers sinnes by mee committed I am tosuffer very great and grievous paines. Then Meucio demaundedparticularly, the punishments inflicted there, for the severall sinnescommitted heere: Wherein Tingoccio fully resolved him. And uponfurther question, what hee would have to be done for him here, madeanswere, That Meucio should cause Masses, Prayers and Almes-deeds tobe performed for him, which (he said) were very helpefull to thesoules abiding there, and Meucio promised to see them done.
2.  Afterward, Thorello (by very much importunitie) wonne them to staywith him all the rest of the day; wherefore, when they had restedthemselves awhile, being attyred in their newly given robes; they rodeon Horsebacke thorow the Citty. When supper time came, they supt inmost honourable and worthy company, beeing afterwards Lodged in mostfaire and sumptuous Chambers, and being risen in the morning, inexchange of their horses (over-wearied with Travaile) they found threeother very richly furnished, and their men also in like mannerprovided. Which when Saladine had perceyved, he tooke his Baschaesaside, and spake in this manner.
3.  Say to my Soveraigne Lord, that I must die:
4.  Hereupon, Saladine embracing him, and kissing his forehead, said.All my Gods goe with you, and guard you from any perill, departingso out of the Chamber weeping, and his Baschaes (having likewise takentheir leave of Thorello) followed Saladine into the Hall, whereasthe Bedde stood readily prepared? Because it waxed very late, andthe Magitian also there attending for his dispatch: the Phisitian wentwith the potion to Thorello, and perswading him, in the way offriendship, that it was onely to strengthen him after his greatweaknes: he drank it off, being thereby immediately entraunced, and sopresently sleeping, was (by Saladines command,) laid on thesumptuous and costly Bed, whereon stood an Imperiall Crowne ofinfinite value, appearing (by a description engraven on it) thatSaladine sent it to Madame Adalietta, the wife of Thorello. On hisfinger also hee put a Ring, wherein was enchased an admirableCarbuncle, which seemed like a flaming Torche, the value thereof notto bee estimated. By him likewise hee laid a rich sword, with thegirdle, hangers, and other furniture, such as seldome can be seene thelike. Then hee laid a jewell on the Pillow by him, so sumptuouslieembelished with Pearles and precious Stones, as might have beseemedthe greatest Monarch in the World to weare. Last of all, on eitherside of them, hee set two great Basons of pure Gold, full of doubleducates, many cords of Orient Pearles, Rings, Girdles, and othercostly jewells (over-tedious to bee recounted) and kissing him oncemore as hee lay in the bedde, commanded the Magitian to dispatch andbe gone.
5.  When Ricciardo saw the Father and Mother both there present, hecould not devise what to do or say, his senses became so strangelyconfounded; yet knowing how hainously he had offended, if thestrictnesse of Law should bee challenged against him, falling on hisknees, he saide. Alas Messer Lizio, I humbly crave your mercy,confessing my selfe well worthy of death, that knowing the sharperigour of the Law, I would presume so audaciously to breake it. Butpardon me worthy Sir, my loyall and unfeigned love to your DaughterCatharina, hath bene the only cause of my transgressing.
6.  Lesca, comforted her Lady, so much as lay in her power to doe, andhaving sought for Pyrrhus, whom she found at good leysure; and, in apleasing humor, thus she beganne. Pyrrhus, some few dayes since Itolde thee, in what extreame Agonies thy Lady and mine was, onely inregarde of her love to thee: and now againe I come once more, togive thee further assurance thereof: Wherefore, beleeve itunfeignedly, that if thy obstinacie continue still, in like manneras the other day it did, expect very shortly to heare the tydings ofher death.

推荐功能

1.  Not long after, Count Bertrand was recalled home by his people:and he having heard of his wives absence, went to Roussillion somuch the more willingly. And the Countesse knowing her husbandsdeparture from Florence, as also his safe arrivall at his ownedwelling, remained still in Florence, untill the time of herdeliverance, which was of two goodly Sonnes, lively resembling thelookes of their Father, and all the perfect lineaments of his body.Perswade your selves, she was not a little carefull of theirnursing; and when she saw the time answerable to her determination,she tooke her journey (unknowne to any) and arrived with them atMontpellier, where she rested her selfe for divers dayes, after solong and wearisome a journey.
2.  Silvestra, who was now become full of pitty too late, quickelycondiscended, as desiring to see him dead, whom sometime she dearlyaffected in life. And being come to the Church, it is a matter to beadmired, if advisedly we consider on the powerfull working of love;for the heart of this woman, which the prosperous fortune ofJeronimo could not pierce, now in his wofull death split in sunder;and the ancient sparks of love so long concealed in the embers,brake foorth into a furious flame; and being violently surprizedwith extraordinary compassion, no sooner did she come neere to thedead body, where many stood weeping round about it; but strangelyshrieking out aloud, she fell downe upon it: and even as extreamity ofgreefe finished his life, so did it hers in the same manner. For shemoved neither hand nor foot, because her vitall powers had quiteforsaken her. The women labouring to comfort her by all best meanesthey could devise; did not take any knowledge of her, by reason of herdisguised garments: but finding her dead indeed, and knowing heralso to be Silvestra, being overcome with unspeakable compassion,and danted with no meane admiration, they stood strangely gazingeach upon other.
3.  It is my purpose, to acquaint you with a notable mockerie, which wasperformed (not in jest, but earnest) by a faire Gentlewoman, to agrave and devoute Religious Friar, which will yeelde so much themore pleasure and recreation, to every secular understander, if butdiligently he or she doe observe, how commonly those Religious persons(at least the most part of them) like notorious fooles, are theinventers of new courses and customes, as thinking themselves morewise and skilful in all things then any other; yet prove to be of noworth or validity, addicting the verie best of all their devices, toexpresse their owne vilenesse of mind, and fatten themselves intheir styes like to pampered Swine. And assure your selves worthyLadies, that I doe not tell this tale onely to follow the orderenjoyned me; but also to informe you that such Saint-like holy Sirs,of whom we are too opinionate and credulous, may be, yea and are(divers times) cunningly met withall, in theyr craftinesse, notonely by men, but likewise some of our owne sexe, as shall make itapparant to you.
4.  Puccio instantly replyed. Now trust me Sir, there is no greatdifficultie in this labour, neither doth it require anyextraordinary length of time: but it may very easily be followed andperformed, and (by your friendly favor, in helping to direct theFurnace and Table, according as you imagine most convenient) on Sundayat night next, I will begin my taske.The place which Puccio had chosen, for his hopefull attaining tothe Philosophers Stone, was close to the Chamber where his daughterlay having no other separation or division, but an old ruinoustottring wall. So that, when the Scholler was playing his prize,Puccio heard an unwonted noise in the house, which he had neverobserved before, neither knew the wall to have any such motion:wherefore, not daring to stirre from his standing, least all should bemarrd in the very beginning, he called to his daughter, demanding,what busle labour she was about? The widdow, being much addicted tofrumping according as questions were demanded of her, and (perhaps)forgetting who spake to her, pleasantly replied: Whoop Sir, whereare we now? Are the Spirits of Alchimy walking in the house, that wecannot lye quietly in our beds?
5.   When she saw that this domesticke disquietnesse returned her nobenefit, but rather tended to her own consumption, then anyamendment in her miserable Husband, shee began thus to conferre withher private thoughts. This Husband of mine liveth with me, as if hewere no Husband, or I his Wife; the marriage bed, which should be acomfort to us both, seemeth hatefull to him, and as little pleasing tomee, because his minde is on his money, his head busied with worldlycogitations, and early and late in his counting-house, admitting nofamiliar conversation with me. Why should not I be as respectlesseof him, as he declares him selfe to be of me? I tooke him for anHusband, brought him a good and sufficient Dowry, thinking him to beman, and affected a woman as a man ought to doe, else he had neverbeene any Husband of mine. If he be a Woman hater, why did he makechoice of me to be his Wife? If I had not intended to be of the World,I could have coopt my selfe up in a Cloyster, and shorne my selfe aNunne, but that I was not born to such severity of life. My youthshall be blasted with age before I can truly understand what youth is,and I shall be branded with the disgraceful word barrennesse,knowing my selfe meete and able to be a Mother, were my Husband butwort the name of a Father, or expected issue and posterity, to leaveour memoriall to after times in our race, as all our predecessoursformerly have done, and for which mariage was chiefly instituted.Castles long besieged, doe yeeld at the last, and women wronged bytheir owne husbands, can hardly warrant their owne frailety,especially living among so many temptations, which flesh and bloud arenot alwaies able to resist. Well, I meane to be advised in thiscase, before I will hazard my honest reputation, either to suspitionor scandall, then which, no woman can have two heavier enemies, andvery few there are that can escape them.
6.  UNDER THE REGIMENT OF MADAM NEIPHILA: CONCERNING SUCH PERSONS

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1.  Seeing is my fortune, Gracious ladies, that I must give beginning tothis dayes discoursing, by some such Novel which I thinke expedient;as duty bindeth me, I am therewith well contented. And because thedeceits of Women to men, have beene at large and liberally related;I will tell you a subtile tricke of a man to a Woman. Not that I blamehim for the deede, or thinke the deceyte not well fitted to the woman:but I speake it in a contrarie nature, as commending the man, andcondemning the woman very justly, as also to shew, how men can as wellbeguile those crafty companions, which least beleeve any suchcunning in them, as they that stand most on their artificiall skill.
2.  In Tuscanie there was sometime an Abbey, seated, as now we seecommonly they are, in a place not much frequented with people, andthereof a Monke was Abbot, very holy and curious in all things else,save onely a wanton appetite to women: which yet he kept so cleanly tohimselfe, that though some did suspect it, yet it was knowne to veryfew. It came to passe, that a rich Country Franklin, named Ferando,dwelt as neere neighbour to the said Abby, he being a man materiall,of simple and grosse understanding, yet he fell into great familiaritywith the Abbot; who made use of this friendly conversation to no otherend, but for divers times of recreation; when he delighted to smile athis silly and sottish behaviour.
3.  The Sunne was now somewhat farre declined, and the heatesextremity well worne away: when the Tales of the seaven Ladies andthree Gentlemen were thus finished, whereupon their Queenepleasantly said. For this day (faire company) there remaineth nothingmore to be done under my regiment, but onely to bestow a new Queeneupon you, who (according to her judgement) must take her turne, anddispose what next is to be done, for continuing our time in honestpleasure. And although the day should endure till darke night; inregard, that when some time is taken before, the better preparationmay bee made for occasions to follow, to the end also, that whatsoeverthe new Queene shall please to appoint, may be the better fitted forthe morrow: I am of opinion, that at the same houre as we now cease,the following dayes shall severally begin. And therefore, in reverenceto him that giveth life to all things, and in hope of comfort by oursecond day; Madam Philomena, a most wise young Lady, shall governeas Queene this our Kingdome.
4、  Sayling on prosperously in our Ship, it was not long before wearrived at Baga, where being landed, and not knowing any person,neither what I should say to the Gentlemen, who onely were carefullfor delivering me to my Father, according as they were charged bythe reverend Abbesse: it was the will of heaven doubtlesse (in pittyand compassion of my passed disasters) that I was no sooner come onshore at Baffa, but I should there haply meet with Antigonus, whom Icalled unto in our Country language because I would not beunderstood by the Gentlemen nor their wives, requesting him toacknowledge me as his daughter. Quickly he apprehended mine intention,accomplishing what requested, and (according to his poore power)most bounteously feasted the Gentlemen and their wives, conductingme to the King of Cyprus, who received me royally, and sent me home toyou with so much honour, as I am no way able to relate. What elseretnaineth to be said, Antigonus who hath oft heard the whole story ofmy misfortunes, at better leysure will report.
5、  By some enemies of his, Master Can de la Scala was incensed, thatwhatsoever he gave or bestowed on him, was as ill imployed and utterlylost, as if it were throwne into the fire, and therefore he neitherdid or spake any thing to him. Some few dayes being passed over, andBergamino perceiving, that hee was neither called, nor any accountmade of, notwithstanding many manly good parts in him; observingbeside, that hee found a shrewd consumption in his purse, his Inne,horses, and servants, being chargeable to him, he began to growextremely melancholly, and yet hee attended in expectation day by day,as thinking it farre unfitting for him, to depart before he was biddenfarewell.

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  • 姜皮 08-04

      But returning where I left (being led out of my way by a just andreligious anger against such deformity) this Gentleman, MasterGuillaume Boursier, was willingly seene, and gladly welcommed by allthe best men in Geneway. Having remained some few daies in the City,and amongst other matters, heard much talke of the miserablecovetousnesse of master Herminio, he grew very desirous to have asight of him. Master Herminio had already understood, that thisGentleman, Master Guillaume Boursier was vertuously disposed, and (howcovetously soever hee was inclined) having in him some sparkes ofnoble nature, gave him very good words, and gracious entertainment,discoursing with him on divers occasions.

  • 杨传堂 08-04

      If any man having in his house a good and faithfull servant, whofalling into extremity of sickenesse, shall be throwne forth intothe open street, without any care or pitty taken on him: A strangerchanceth to passe by, and (moved with compassion of his weakenesse)carryeth him home to his owne house, where using all charitable andnot sparing any cost, he recovereth the sicke person to his formerhealth. I now desire to know, if keeping the said restored person, andimploying him about his owne businesse: the first Master (bypretending his first right) may lawfully complaine of the second,and yeeld him backe againe to the first master, albeit he doe makechallenge of him?

  • 陈文衢 08-04

       To finish greefe and life in one blest houre.

  • 米尔德里·菲西 08-04

      In this towne of Chasteau Guillaume, lived a young Lady, who was awiddow, so beautifull and comely of her person, as sildome was seene amore lovely creature. The Marquesse Azzo most dearely affected her,and (as his choysest Jewell of delight) gave her that house to livein, under the terrace whereof poore Rinaldo made his shelter. Itchaunced the day before, that the Marquesse was come thither,according to his frequent custome, to weare away that night in hercompany, she having secretly prepared a Bath for him, and a costlysupper beside. All things being ready, and nothing wanting but theMarquesse his presence: suddenly a Post brought him such Letters,which commanded him instantly to horsebacke, and word hee sent tothe Lady, to spare him for that night, because urgent occasions calledhim thence, and hee rode away immediately.

  • 韩公 08-03

    {  Late in the dead time of the night, the Abbot himselfe entred intothe darke dungeon, and in an hollow counterfeited voyce, called toFerando, saying. Comfort thy selfe Ferando, for the Fates are nowpleased, that thou shalt bee released out of Purgatory, and sent tolive in the world againe. Thou didst leave thy wife newly conceivedwith childe, and this very morning she is delivered of a goodly Sonne,whom thou shalt cause to be named Bennet: because, by the incessantprayers of the holy Abbot, thine owne loving Wife, and for sweet SaintBennets sake, this grace and favour is afforded thee. Ferandohearing this, was exceeding joyfull, and returned this answere: Forever honored be the Fates, the holy Lord Abbot, blessed SaintBennet, and my most dearely beloved Wife, whom I will faithfullylove for ever, and never more offend her by any jealous in me.

  • 毛戈平 08-02

      Having brought with him thither three goodly rich garments, whichhad beene given him by sundrie Lords, for his more sightlyappearance at this great meeting; the importunate Host being greedieof payment, first he delivered him one of them, and yet not halfethe score being wiped off, the second must needes follow; andbeside, except he meant to leave his lodging, hee must live upon thethird so long as it would last, till hee saw what end his hopeswould sort too. It fortuned, during the time of living thus upon hislast refuge, that hee met with Maister Can one day at dinner, where hepresented himselfe before him, with a discontented countenance:which Maister Can well observing, more to distaste him, then takedelight in any thing that could come from him, he sayd. Bergamino, howcheerest thou? Thou art very melancholly, I prythee tell us why?Bergamino suddenly, without any premeditation, yet seeming as if hehad long considered thereon, reported this Tale.}

  • 蔡武 08-02

      Not long since, there lived in Naples, an honest meane man, whodid take to Wife, a fayre and lustie young Woman, being namedPeronella.-He professing the Trade of a Mason, and shee Carding andSpinning, maintained themselves in a reasonable condition, abating andabounding as their Fortunes served. It came to passe, that acertayne young man, well observing the beauty and good parts ofPeronella, became much addicted in affection towardes her: and byhis often and secret sollicitations, which he found not to beunkindely entertayned; his successe proved answerable to his hope,no unindifferencie appearing in their purposes, but where her estateseemed weakest, his supplies made an addition of more strength.

  • 辛杜 08-02

      The men of Rhodes, being rather constrained thereto, then of anyfree disposition in themselves, with teares in their eyes, deliveredIphigenia to Chynon; who beholding her in like manner to weepe, thusspake unto her. Noble Lady, do not any way discomfort your selfe,for I am your Chynon, who have more right and true title to you, andmuch better doe deserve to enjoy you, by my long continued affectionto you, then Pasimondo can any way plead; because you belong to himbut onely by promise. So, bringing her aboord his owne ship, where theGentlemen his companions gave her kinde welcome, without touchingany thing else belonging to the Rhodians, he gave them free liberty todepart.

  • 刘裕良 08-01

       And if not I, etc.

  • 胡精沛 07-30

    {  After the Song was past, divers other were sung beside, and it nowdrawing wel-neere midnight, by the Kings command, they all went tobed. And when new day appeared, and all the world awaked out ofsleepe, the Master of the Houshold having sent away the carriages;they returned (under the conduct of their discreet King) toFlorence, where the three Gentlemen left the seven Ladies at theChurch of Santa Maria Novella, from whence they went with them atthe first. And having parted with kinde salutations, the Gentlemenwent whether themselves best pleased, and the Ladies repaired hometo their houses.

  • 任素永 07-30

      Thorello having drunke a heartie draught to the Bride, conveyedthe Ring into the Cuppe, before any person could perceive it, andhaving left but small store of Wine in it, covered the Cuppe, and sentit againe to the Bride, who received it very gracioasly, and to honourthe Stranger in his Countries custome, dranke up the rest of the Wine,and espying the Ring, shee tooke it forth undescried by any: Knowingit to be the same Ring which shee gave Signior Thorello at his partingfrom her; she fixed her eyes often on it, and as often on him, whomshe thought to be a stranger, the cheerfull bloud mounting up into hercheeks, and returning againe with remembrance to her heart, that(howsoever thus disguised) he only was her husband.

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