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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:阿玛尼 大小:jKRDa6Kc61928KB 下载:l6togMfD32339次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:qjKETJpc55593条
日期:2020-08-04 20:12:04
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周江波

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  For I beheld another in my place,
2.  The yong man, hearing these wordes, and remembring what lovingkindnesse he had formerly found, what secret love Letters he hadsent from Paris, with other private intelligences and tokens, whichnever came to her receite and knowledge, so cunningly his Mother andTutors had carried the matter: immediately felt his heart-strings tobreake, and lying downe upon the beds side by her, uttered these hisvery last words. Silvestra farewell, thou hast kilde the kindest heartthat ever loved a woman: and speaking no more, gave up the ghost.She hearing these words delivered with an entire sighe, anddeepe-fetcht groane, did not imagine the strange consequence followingthereon; yet was mooved to much compassion, in regard of her formeraffection to him. Silent she lay an indifferent while, as being unableto returne him any answer, and looking when he would be gone,according as before she had earnestly entreated him. But when sheperceyved him to lye so still, as neither word or motion came fromhim, she saide: Kinde Jeronimo, why doest thou not depart and get theegone? So putting forth her hand, it hapned to light upon his face,which she felt to be as cold as yce: whereat marvailing not alittle, as also at his continued silence, she jogged him, and felt hishands in like manner, which were stiffely extended forth, and allhis body cold, as not having any life remaining in him, whichgreatly amazing her, and confounding her with sorrow beyond allmeasure, she was in such perplexity, that she could not devise what todo or say.
3.  She was a Lady of extraordinary beauty, tall stature, verysumptuously attired, and having two sweet Sonnes (resembling Angels)she came with them waiting before her, and graciously saluted herguests.
4.  Cast an heedfull eye then (good Father) upon all your Gentlemen, andadvisedly examine their vertues, conditions, and manner ofbehaviour. On the other side, observe those parts remaining inGuiscardo: and then if you will Judge truly, and without affection,you will confesse him to be most Noble, and that all your Gentlemen(in respect of him) are but base Groomes and villaines. His vertuesand excelling perfections, I never credited from the report orjudgement of any person; but onely by your speeches, and mine owneeyes as true witnesses. Who did ever more commend Guiscardo, extollingall those singularities in him, most requisite to be in an honestvertuous man; then you your selfe have done? Nor neede you to besorry, or ashamed of your good opinion concerning him: for if mineeyes have not deceived my judgement, you never gave him the least partof praise, but I have knowne much more in him, then ever your wordswere able to expresse: wherefore, if I have beene any way deceived,truly the deceit proceeded onely from you. How wil you then maintaine,that I have throwne my liking on a man of base condition? In troth(Sir) you cannot. Perhaps you will alledge, that he is but meane andpoore; I confesse it, and surely it is to your shame, that you havenot bestowne place of more preferment, on a man so honest and welldeserving, and having bene so long a time your servant.Neverthelesse poverty impayreth not any part of noble Nature, butwealth hurries into horrible confusions. Many Kings and greatPrinces have heeretofore beene poore, when divers of them that havedelved into the earth, and kept Flockes in the field, have beeneadvanced to riches, and exceeded the other in wealth.
5.  To approve his words, the feathers, feete, and beake were broughtin, which when she saw, she greatly blamed him for killing so rare aFaulcon, to content the appetite of any woman whatsoever. Yet shecommended his height of spirit, which poverty had no power to abase.Lastly, her hopes being frustrate for enjoying the Faulcon, andfearing besides the health of her Sonne, she thanked Frederigo for hishonorable kindnesse, returning home againe sad and melancholly.Shortly after, her sonne either greeving that he could not have theFaulcon, or by extreamity of his disease, chanced to dye, leavinghis mother a most wofull Lady.
6.  CAN EVER COMPREHEND

计划指导

1.  It is no little joy to mee, that we understand so well (by thediscourses already past) what power consisteth in the delivery of wiseand readie answeres; And because it is a great part of sence andjudgement in men, to affect women of greater birth and quality thenthemselves, as also an admirable fore-sight in women, to keepe offfrom being surprized in love, by Lords going beyond them in degree:a matter offereth it selfe to my memory, well deserving my speechand your attention, how a Gentlewoman (both in word and deede)should defend her honor in that kind, when importunity laboureth tobetray it.
2.  Aloft they look, to make their flight more faire.
3.  In a short while after, Master Doctor Mazzeo was returned fromMalfy, to proceede in his cure of the poore mans legge; and callingfor his glasse of Water, which he left standing in his owne Chamberwindow, it was found quite empty, and not a drop in it: whereat heraged so extreamly, as never had the like impatience bene noted inhim. His wife, and her Maide, who had another kinde of businesse intheir braine, about a dead man so strangely come to life againe,knew not well what to say; but at the last, his Wife thus replyedsomewhat angerly. Sir (quoth she) what a coyle is here about apaltry glasse of Water, which perhaps hath bene spilt, yet neytherof us faulty therein? Is there no more such water to be had in theworld? Alas deere Wife (saide he) you might repute it to be a commonkinde of Water, but indeed it was not so; for I did purposely compoundit, onely to procure a dead seeming sleepe: And so related the wholematter at large, of the Pacients legge, and his Waters losse.
4.  Never more shall thy falshood me enfolde.
5.  THE FIRST DAY, THE SECOND NOVELL
6.  Among many other of his feminine Parishioners, all of them beinghansome and comely Women: yet there was one more pleasing in hiswanton eye, then any of the rest, named Monna Belcolore, and wife to aplaine mecanicke man, called Bentivegna del Mazzo. And, to speakeuprightly, few Countrey Villages yeelded a Woman, more fresh andlovely of complexion, although not admirable for beauty, yet sweeteSir Simon thoght her a Saint, and faine would be offering at hershrine. Divers prety pleasing qualities she had, as sounding theCymball, playing artificially on the Timbrill, and singing theretoas it had beene a Nightingale, dancing also so dexteriously, ashappy was the man that could dance in her company. All which soenflamed sweet Sir Simon, that he lost his wonted sprightly behaviour,walked sullen, sad and melancholly, as if he had melted all hismettall, because hee could hardly have a sight of her. But on theSonday morning, when hee heard or knew that she was in the Church, heewould tickle it with a Kyrie and a Sancsingular skill in singing, whenit had beene as good to heare an Asse bray. Whereas on the contrary,when she came not to Church Masse, and all else were quicklie shakenuppe, as if his devotion waited onely on her presence. Yet he was socunning in the carriage of his amorous businesse, both for her crediteand his owne; as Bentivegna her husband could not perceive it, orany neighbor so much as suspect it.

推荐功能

1.  Without imparting his mind unto any one, he would daily passe tooand fro before her doore; which she observing, and havingindifferently wounded him with her wanton piercing lookes: she beganto use the first tricke of her Trade, by pretending her enflamedaffection towards him, which made her pine and consume away in care,except he might be moved to pitty her. Whereupon, she sent one ofher Pandoraes unto him, perfectly instructed in the Art of aMaquerella, who (after many cunning counterfetted sighes, andteares, which she had alwayes ready at command) told him that hiscomely person and compleate perfections, had so wounded the very souleof her Mistresse, as she could enjoy no rest in any place, either byday or night. In regard whereof, she desired (above all things else)to meete with him privately in a Bathe: with which Wordes, shestraightway tooke a Ring forth of her pursse, and in most humblemanner, delivered it unto him, as a token from her Mistresse.
2.  The Tale reported by Dioneus, at the first hearing of the Ladies,began to rellish of some immodestie, as the bashfull blood mounting upinto their faces, delivered by apparant testimonie. And beholdingone another with scarse-pleasing lookes, during all the time it was indiscoursing, no sooner had he concluded: but with a few milde andgentle speeches, they gave him a modest reprehension, and meaning tolet him know that such tales ought not to be tolde among women.Afterward, the Queene commaunded Madam Fiammetta, (sitting on abanke of flowers before her) to take her turne as next in order; andshe, smiling with such a virgin blush, as very beautifully became her,began in this manner.
3.  There dwelt sometime in Florence, one who was generally called bythe name of Guiotto, a man being the greatest Gourmand, and grossestfeeder, as ever was seene in any Countrey, all his meanes andprocurements meerly unable to maintaine expences for filling hisbelly. But otherwise he was of sufficient and commendable carriage,fairely demeaned, and well- discoursing on any argument: yet, not as acurious and spruce Courtier, but rather a frequenter of rich mensTables, where choice of good cheere is sildome wanting, and suchshould have his company, albeit not invited, yet (like a boldintruder) he had the courage to bid himselfe welcome.
4.  Gerbino espying his gracious Mistresse on the Ships decke, and sheappearing to be farre more beautifull then Fame had made relation ofher: being much more enflamed now, then formerly he had bin, replyedthus when they shewed the Glove. We have (quoth he) no Faulcon herenow, to be humbled at the sight of your Glove: and therefore, if youwill not deliver the Lady, prepare your selves for fight, for wemust have her whether you will or no. Hereupon, they began to let flie(on both sides) their Darts and arrowes, with stones sent in violentsort from their slings, thus continuing the fight a long while, tovery great harme on either side. At the length, Gerbino perceiving,that small benefit would redound to him, if he did not undertakesome other kinde of course: he tooke a small Pinnace, whichpurposely he brought with him from Sardignia, and setting it on aflaming fire, conveyed it (by the Gallies help) close to the ship. TheSarazines much amazed thereat, and evidently perceiving, that eitherthey must yeeld or dye; brought their Kings daughter to the prow ofthe ship, most greevously weeping and wringing her hands. Then callingGerbino, to let him behold their resolution, there they slew hirbefore his face, and afterward, throwing her body into the Sea, saide:Take her, there we give her to thee, according to our bounden duty,and as thy perjury hath justly deserved.
5.   Gulfardo made a match or wager, with the Wife of Gasparuolo, for theobtaining of her amorous favour, in regard of a summe of money firstto be given her. The money hee borrowed of her Husband, and gave it inpayment to her, as in case of discharging him from her Husbandsdebt. After his returne home from Geneway, hee told him in thepresence of his wife, how he had payde the whole summe to her, withcharge of delivering it to her Husband, which she confessed to betrue, albeit greatly against her will.
6.  Dismounting from his horse, he walked on with Nathan, diverslydiscoursing, untill they came to the Pallace, where one of theservants taking Mithridanes his horse, Nathan rounded the fellow inthe eare, that he should give warning to al. throughout the House, forrevealing to the Gentleman, that he was Nathan; as accordingly itwas performed. No sooner were they within the Pallace, but heconducted Mithridanes into a goodly chamber, wher none (as yet) hadseene him, but such as were appointed to attend on him reverently;yea, and he did himselfe greatly honor him, as being loth to leave hiscompany.

应用

1.  Mervaile and amazement, encreased in Nicostratus far greater thenbefore, hearing him to avouch still so constantly what he had seene,no contradiction being able to alter him, which made him rashly sweareand say. I will see my selfe, whether this Peare-tree bee enchanted,or no: and such wonders to be seene when a man is up in it, as thouwouldst have us to beleeve. And being mounted up so hy, that they weresafe from his sodaine comming on them, Lydia had soone forgotten hersicknes, and the promised kisse cost her above twenty more, besideverie kinde and hearty embraces, as lovingly respected and entertainedby Pyrrhus. Which Nicostratus beholding aloft in the tree; cryed outto her, saying. Wicked woman, What doest thou meane? And thouvillain Pyrrhus, Darst thou abuse thy Lord, who hath reposed so muchtrust in thee? So, descending in haste downe againe, yet crying soto them still: Lydia replyed, Alas my Lord, Why do you raile andrave in such sort? So, he( found her seated as before, and Pyrrhuswaiting with dutiful reverence, even as when he climbed up the Tree:but yet he thought his sight not deceyved, for all their demure andformall behaviour, which made him walke up and downe, extreamelyfuming and fretting unto himselfe, and which in some milder mannerto qualifie, Pyrrhus spake thus to him.
2.  WHEREIN IS DECLARED, WHAT HARD AND NARROW SHIFTS AND DISTRESSES,
3.  Her Brethren in scornefull manner reprooved her, telling her, thathe was a begger, and had nothing left to keepe him in the world. Iknow it well (quoth she) and am heartily sorry for it. But give me aman that hath neede of wealth, rather then wealth that hath neede of aman. The Brethren hearing how she stood addicted, and knowingFrederigo to be a worthy Gentleman, though poverty had disgraced himin the World: consented thereto, so she bestowed her selfe and herriches on him. He on the other side, having so noble a Lady to hisWife, and the same whom he had so long and deerely loved, submittedall his fairest Fortunes unto her, became a better husband (for theworld) then before, and they lived, and loved together in equall joyand happinesse.
4、  Dioneus listened attentively to the Queen's discourse, and whenshe had done and he knew that only he remained to complete the day'sentertainment, without trifling away the time or awaiting a commandfrom the Queen, thus he began.
5、  Knowing that this cry was in his house, hee tooke the Candle inhis hand, and going foorth of the Parlour, heard the cry to be louder;because the Asse removed not his foote, but rather trod the morefirmely on his hand. Comming to the Coope, driving the Asse, andtaking off the old sacke, he espyed the young man, who, beside thepainefull anguish he felt of his fingers, arose up trembling, asfearing some outrage beside to bee offered him by Pedro, who knewthe youth perfectly, and demaunded of him, how he came thither. Noanswere did hee make to that question, but humbly entreated (forcharities sake) that hee would not doe him any harme. Feare not (quothPedro) I will not offer thee any violence: onely tell mee how thoucamest hither, and for what occasion; wherein the youth fully resolvedhim.

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网友评论(SuyD0xaJ89929))

  • 陈明明 08-03

      Earely on the Sonday Morning, Aurora shewing her selfe bright andlovely; the Sunnes Golden beames beganne to appeare, on the toppesof the neere adjoyning Mountaines; so, that Hearbes, Plants, Trees,and all things else, were verie evidently to be discerned.

  • 福尔曼 08-03

      Then I called to minde, that having redelivered the Purse and Girdleto his shee-Messenger, which brought them with lookes sufficient todeclare my discontentment: I called her backe againe, fearing leastshe would keep them to her selfe, and make him beleeve that I hadreceived them (as I have heard such kinde of women use to dosometimes) and in anger I snatcht them from her, and have brought themyou, to the end, that you may give him them againe; and tell him, Ihave no need of any such things, thankes be to heaven and myhusband, as no woman can be better stored then I am. Wherefore goodFather, purposely am I now come to you, to let him know, that if hewill not abstaine from thus molesting me, I will disclose it to myHusband, Father, and Brethren, whatsoever befall. For I had ratherhe should receive the injury, then I to be causelessly blamed for him;wherein good Father tell me, if I dooe not well. With manycounterfet sobbes, sighes, and teares these words were delivered;and drawing foorth from under her gowne, a very faire and richpurse, as also a Girdle of great worth, she threw them into the Friarslappe.

  • 奥茨 08-03

       Sir, saide the King, it is our will that it shall be so, vertuousshe is, faire and wise; she loveth thee most affectionately, andwith her mayest thou lead a more Noble life, then with the greatestLady in our Kingdome. Silent, and discontented stoode the Count, butthe King commanded preparation for the marriage; and when theappointed time was come, the Count (albeit against his will)received his wife at the Kings hand; she loving him deerly as her ownelife. When all was done, the Count requested of the King, that whatelse remained for further solemnization of the marriage, it might beperformed in his owne Country, reserving to himselfe what else heintended. Being mounted on horseback, and humbly taking their leave ofthe King, the Count would not ride home to his owne dwelling, but intoTuscany, where he heard of a warre between the Florentines and theSenesi, purposing to take part with the Florentines, to whom he waswillingly and honourably welcommed, being created Captaine of a worthyCompany, and continuing there a long while in service.

  • 水晶·卡芭拉 08-03

      After she had an indifferent while considered with her selfe, herresolution became so indauntable; that she would adventure to practisesuch meanes, whereby to compasse those two apparant impossibilities,and so to enjoy the love of her husband. Having absolutely concludedwhat was to be done, she assembled all the cheefest men of thecountry, revealing unto them (in mournfull manner) what an attempt shehad made already, in hope of recovering her husbands favour, andwhat a rude answer was thereon returned. In the end, she told them,that it did not sute with her unworthinesse, to make the Count live asan exile from his owne inheritance, upon no other inducement, butonely in regard of her: wherefore, she had determined betweeneheaven and her soule, to spend the remainder of her dayes inPilgrimages and prayers, for preservation of the Counts soule andher owne; earnestly desiring them, to undertake the charge andgovernment of the Country, and signifying unto the Count, how shehad forsaken his house, and purposed to wander so farre thence, thatnever would she visit Roussillion any more. In the deliverie ofthese words, the Lords and Gentlemen wept and sighedextraordinarily, using many earnest imprecations to alter this resolvein her, but all was in vaine.

  • 唐海奎 08-02

    {  LEARNING AND IGNORANCE, UPON JUDICIOUS APPREHENSION

  • 吴晓丽 08-01

      After they were gone a good distance off, the good old man beganthus to question his Wife. What is become of (quoth hee) our youngGentlewoman, which came so late to us yesternight? I have not seen herto day since our arising. The old woman made answer, that she knew notwhere she was, and sought all about to finde her. Angelinaes fearesbeing well over-blowne, and hearing none of the former noise, whichmade her the better hope of their departure, came forth of theHay-stack; wherof the good old man was not a little joyfull, andbecause she had so well escaped from them: so seeing it was nowbroad day-light, he said unto her. Now that the morning is sofairely begun, if you can be so well contented, we will bring you to aCastle, which stands about two miles and an halfe hence, where youwill be sure to remaine in safety. But you must needs travaile thitheron foot, because the nightwalkers that happened hither, have takenaway your horse with them.}

  • 李道宗 08-01

      When the next foode was sent to Ferando, so much of the powder wasmingled with the wine, as would serve onely for foure houresentrauncing, in which time, they clothed him in his owne wearingapparell againe, the Abbot himselfe in person, and his honest trustyMonke of Bologna, conveying and laying him in the same vault under theTombe, where at the first they gave him buriall. The next morningfollowing, the breake of day, Ferando recovered his senses, and thorowdivers chinkes and crannies of the Tombe, descried daylight, which heehad not see in tenne moneths space before. Perceiving then plainely,that he was alive, he cryed out aloude, saying: Open, open, and letmee forth of Purgatory, for I have beene heere long enough inconscience. Thrusting up his head against the cover of the Tombe,which was not of any great strength, neither well closed together; heeput it quite off the Tombe, and so got forth upon his feete: atwhich instant time, the Monks having ended their morning Mattins,and hearing the noyse, ran in hast thither, and knowing the voyce ofFerando, saw that he was come forth of the Monument.

  • 曹之玉 08-01

      Alas Gentlemen, it is you your selves that are void ofunderstanding: for, if you had but observed the answer which he madeunto us: hee did honestly, and (in verie few words) not onelynotably expresse his owne wisedome, but also deservedly reprehendus. Because, if wee observe things as we ought to doe, Graves andTombes are the houses of the dead, ordained and prepared to be theirlatest dwellings. He tolde us moreover, that although we have heere(in this life) other habitations and abidings; yet these (or the like)must at last be our houses. To let us know, and all other foolish,indiscreete, and unleartied men, that we are worse then dead men, incomparison of him, and other men equall to him in skill andlearning. And therefore, while wee are heere among these Graves andMonuments, it may well be said, that we are not farre from our ownehouses, or how soone we shall be possessors of them, in regard ofthe frailty attending on us.

  • 萨缅托 07-31

       The Monke, though his delight with the Damosell was extraordinary,yet feare and suspition followed upon it; for, in the very height ofall his wantonnesse, he heard a soft treading about the doore. Andprying thorow a small crevice in the same dore, perceived apparantly,that the Abbot himselfe stood listening there, and could not beignorant but that the Maide was with him in the Chamber. As afterpleasure ensueth paine, for the veniall Monke knew well enough (thoughwanton heate would not let him heede it before) that most greevouspunishment must bee inflicted on him, which made him sad beyond allmeasure: Neverthelesse, without disclosing his dismay to the yongMaiden, he began to consider with himselfe on many meanes, wherebyto find out one that might best fit his turne. And suddenlyconceited an apt stratagem, which sorted to such effect as he wouldhave it: whereupon, seeming satisfied for that season, he tolde theDamosell, that (being carefull of her credit) as hee had brought herin unseene of any, so he would free her from thence againe, desiringher to tarrie there (without making any noyse at all) untill such timeas he returned to her.

  • 罗德·拉沃尔 07-29

    {  Ill should I take revenge on a King, that had offended me, if Ihad not so much heart, as to wreake my spleene on a paltry Hawke.Understand then, worthy Lords and Ladies, that this Faulcone hath longtime robbed me of those delights, which men (in meere equitie) oughtto have with their wives: because continually, so as breake of dayhath appeared, my Husband, starting out of bed, makes him selfereadie, presently to Horsse, and with this Faulcon on his Fist,rides abroad to his recreation in the Fields. And I, in suchforsaken sort as you see, am left all alone in my bed, discontentedand despised: often vowing to my selfe, to bee thus revenged as nowI am, being with-held from it by no other occasion, but onely wantof a fit and apt time, to do it in the presence of such persons, asmight bee just judges of my wrongs, and as I conceive you all to be.

  • 朱耀垠 07-29

      I know not (Gracious Ladies) whether I can move you to as heartylaughter, with a briefe Novell of mine owne, as Pamphilus lately didwith his: yet I dare assure you, that it is both true and pleasant,and I will relate it in the best manner I can.

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